Erinyes   ee RIHN ih eez

The Mist-Walking

Originally called Erinys... later called, Erinyes. Referred to as, ‘the mist-walking... ’ and, with fear and respect, ‘the kindly one’. She would harass and injure her prey but not kill them. Homer refers to her in the singular (Odyssey, book 15, line 234) but, much later (circa 450 BCE), Euripides used the number ‘three’ and eventually ‘they’ assumed the names: Tisiphone, Megaera and Alekto (Alecto). Their brass wings made escape impossible, their ripping claws made their torment relentless and horrible.

We often confuse ‘them’ with the Roman goddesses, the Furiae (Furies).

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Erinyes in The Iliad (listed by book and line)

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Erinyes in The Odyssey (listed by book and line)

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How to Cite this Page

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Stewart, Michael. "Erinyes", Greek Mythology: From the Iliad to the Fall of the Last Tyrant. http://messagenetcommresearch.com/myths/bios/erinyes.html (November 14, 2005)

Cut and paste the following html for use in a web report.

Stewart, Michael. &quot;Erinyes&quot;, <i>Greek Mythology: From the Iliad to the Fall of the Last Tyrant</i>. http://messagenetcommresearch.com/myths/bios/erinyes.html (November 14, 2005)

Cut and paste the following html for use in a web report. This format will link back to this page, which may be useful but may not be required.

Stewart, Michael. &quot;Erinyes&quot;, <i>Greek Mythology: From the Iliad to the Fall of the Last Tyrant</i>. <a href="http://messagenetcommresearch.com/myths/bios/erinyes.html">http://messagenetcommresearch.com/myths/bios/erinyes.html</a> (November 14, 2005)

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