Eos (the Dawn)   E os

Goddess of the Dawn

The beautiful goddess of the dawn, Eos (Erigeneia). In the Homeric Hymn to Helios, we are told that Hyperion married his sister, Eryphaesa, and begot tireless Helios (the Sun), rosy Eos (the Dawn) and fair tressed Selene (the Moon). In the Hymn to Aphrodite, Aphrodite falls in love with a beautiful mortal, Anchises, soon to be the father of Aineias (Aeneas). Aphrodite tells the story of Eos and her abducted lover Tithonos. When Eos went to Zeus to request immortality for her mortal lover, Zeus nodded and made it so... however, Eos did not ask for perpetual youth for Tithonos. As the years passed, he aged and, finally, lost all strength in his limbs. Eos, with love and pity, put him in a private room and shut the shining doors. We can only assume that he is still there.

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Eos in Theogony

In Theogony, of Hesiod (line 372), Theia is listed as the mother of Eos, Helios, and Selene. She and Hyperion were Titans of the same generation as Kronos (Cronos), and like Kronos, were the children of Gaia (the Earth) and Ouranos (the Heavens). Eos, with the Titan Astraios, was mother to the Winds: Zephyros (the West Wind), Boreas (the North Wind) and Notos (the South Wind). She also bore Eosphoros, the dawn star, and a host of other shining stars. With Tithonos she bore Memnon, the ancestor of Agamemnon. (Theogony, line 984). The son of Kephalos and Eos was Phaethon, who was so lovely that Aphrodite (goddess of Love) stole him away and kept him as her temple-keeper.

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Eos in The Iliad (listed by book and line)

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Eos in The Odyssey (listed by book and line)

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How to Cite this Page

Cut and paste the following text for use in a paper or electronic document report.

Stewart, Michael. "Dawn", Greek Mythology: From the Iliad to the Fall of the Last Tyrant. http://messagenetcommresearch.com/myths/bios/dawn.html (November 14, 2005)

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Stewart, Michael. &quot;Dawn&quot;, <i>Greek Mythology: From the Iliad to the Fall of the Last Tyrant</i>. http://messagenetcommresearch.com/myths/bios/dawn.html (November 14, 2005)

Cut and paste the following html for use in a web report. This format will link back to this page, which may be useful but may not be required.

Stewart, Michael. &quot;Dawn&quot;, <i>Greek Mythology: From the Iliad to the Fall of the Last Tyrant</i>. <a href="http://messagenetcommresearch.com/myths/bios/dawn.html">http://messagenetcommresearch.com/myths/bios/dawn.html</a> (November 14, 2005)

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