Ares   AIR eez

God of War

The son of Zeus and Hera, Ares embodied, not just the act, but also the spirit of War.

Disliked by most Olympians but loved by Aphrodite, Ares was a god of action and determination. When he was fighting on the side of the Trojans he was wounded by Pallas Athene (Athena). She donned the helm of Death and, after deflecting his spear, hurled a bolder, knocking Ares senseless. He had to be assisted from the field of battle by Aphrodite. When Ares retreated to Mount Olympos (Olympus) his father, Zeus, said (before commanding Paieon to heal his wounded son) To me you are most hateful of all gods who hold Olympos, (Iliad, book 5, line 889).

Ares was sometimes accompanied into battle by his sister, Eris (Goddess of Discord) and Hades (Lord of the Dead). Ares was the father of Deimos (Fear) and Phobos (Terror), among others. His son Kyknos was killed by Herakles (Heracles) (Theogony, line 421) but Ares was unable to avenge the death because Zeus would not permit his least favorite son, Ares, to harm Herakles, his favorite son. Although hated and feared, Ares was honored by all great warriors, even Herakles.

Ares rode into battle on the side of the Trojans with his horses, Flame and Terror, pulling his war chariot. He swooped down to help Aphrodite defend her son Aineias (Aeneas) (Iliad, book 5, line 355) and saved him from sure death at the hands of the Achaians. While Ares protected Aineias with his shield, Aphrodite made her escape to Mount Olympos to tend her wounds.

He is most often confused with the Roman god, Mars.

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Ares in The Iliad (listed by book and line)

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Ares in The Odyssey (listed by book and line)

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